Political economy is the classical term for economics, but in modern days it has a variety of meanings. For me it refers to a broad approach to economics, and to the understanding of policy-making, that incorporates insights from classical political economists including Marx, and from other modern-day social science disciplines. Some use the phrase ‘heterodox economics’ to describe the same, essentially multi-disciplinary orientation.

All that I have written embodies this broad outlook alongside my conviction that social science needs to be evidence-based and scientific. The following publications show the political economy approach more explicitly.

  1. Green, F. and D. Kynaston (2019). What should be done about the private schools? Rethinking Britain. Policy Ideas for the Many. S. Konzelmann, S. Himmelweit, J. Smith and J. Weeks. Bristol, Policy Press: 173-190.
  2. “The Problem of British Education Policy as Economic Policy” in D. Coffey and C. Thornley (2003) (eds) Industrial and Labour Market Policy and Performance, London: Routledge. Pages 138-144. ISBN 0-415-26786-2.
  3. “The Evolution of Education and Training Strategies in Singapore, Taiwan and S. Korea: A  Developmental Model of Skill Formation” (with D. Ashton, D. James and J. Sung), Journal of Education and Work, 2002, 15 (1), 5-30.
  4. “Economics, Social Capital and the Colonisation of the Social Sciences” (with B. Fine) in Baron, S, Field, J and Schuller, T (eds) Social Capital: Critical Perspectives, Oxford University Press, 2000.
  5. Ashton, D., F. Green, D. James and J. Sung (1999). Education and Training for Development in East Asia The Political Economy of Skill Formation in East Asian Newly Industrialised Economies. London and New York, Routledge. 254.
  6. “The Role of the State in Skill Formation: evidence from The Republic of Korea, Singapore and Taiwan” (with D.James, D.Ashton and J.Sung), Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Spring 1999, 15 (1), 82-96.
  7. “Post-School Education and Training Policy in Developmental States: The Cases of Taiwan and South Korea” (with D.James, D.Ashton and J.Sung), Journal of Education Policy, May-Jun 1999, 14 (3), 301-315.
  8. “Post-School Education and Training Policy in Developmental States: The Cases of Taiwan and South Korea” (with D.James, D.Ashton and J.Sung) in Edwards, R., Miller, N., Small, N. and Tait, A. (eds) Supporting Lifelong Learning, Volume 3; London and New York: Routledge, 2002. Reprinted from Journal of Education Policy, 1999.
  9. Ashton, D. and F. Green (1996). Education, Training and the Global Economy. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar. 933.
  10. “Income Inequality in Corporatist and Liberal Economies: A Comparison of Trends within OECD Countries” (with A.Henley and E. Tsakalotos), International Review of Applied Economics, 8, 3, 1994, 303-331.
  11. “Efficiency” in P. Arestis and M. Sawyer eds. The Elgar Companion to Radical Political Economy, Edward Elgar, 1994.
  12. “On the political economy of skill in the advanced industrial nations”, Review of Political Economy, 4, 4, 1992, 413-435. 
  13. “Neoclassical and Marxian Conceptions of Production: A Reply to Young”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 16, 1, March 1992, 109-111.
  14. “Women in the Economy: A Cause for Optimism?” in J. Michie ed. , The Economic Legacy 1979 – 1992, Academic Press, 1992, 255-257.
  15. “The Relationship of Wages to the Value of Labour Power in Marx’s Labour Market”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 15, June 1991, 199-213.
  16. “The Worker Discipline Effect: A Disaggregative Analysis” (with Thomas E. Weisskopf), Review of Economics and Statistics, LXXII, May 1990, 241-249.
  17. “Empirical Applications of the Reserve Army Hypothesis: A survey” in Paul Dunne (ed.) Quantitative Models of Marxism, Polity Press, 1990, 123-140.
  18. “Marx, Malthus And Wages: A Comment”, History of Political Economy, 23, 1991, 95-100.”The Training System of British Capitalism: Changes and Prospects”, (with D. Ashton and M. Hoskins), in Francis Green (ed.) The Restructuring of the UK Economy, Harvester, 1989, 131-154.
  19. “The Training System of British Capitalism: Changes and Prospects”, (with D. Ashton and M. Hoskins), in Francis Green (ed.) The Restructuring of the UK Economy, Harvester, 1989, 131-154.
  20. “Evaluating Structural Economic Change: Britain in the 1980’s” ibid, 3-22.
  21. “On The Political Economy of Unemployment Policy” in Robert Cherry et al (eds.) The Imperiled Economy, Union for Radical Political Economics, 1987, 267-275.
  22. Articles on Smith, Malthus, Marx, Veblen, Marshall and Keynes, in Donald Clarke (ed.) Great Inventors and Discoveries, Marshall Cavendish, 1978.
  23. “Neoclassical and Marxian Conceptions of Production”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 12(3), Sept. 1988, 299-312. Reprinted in: J.E.King (ed.) Readings in Australian Labour Economics, South Melbourne: Macmillan, 1992, xii, 30-45. ISBN 0 7329 8/1261 X.
  24. “Labor in the Global Economy”, International Labor and Working Class History”, 1987: Fall, 76-79.
  25. “Behind the News: Some Macroeconomic Omens for Thatcher and Reagan”, Capital and Class, 1986: 30.
  26. “A Critique of the Neo-Fisherian Consumption Function”,  Review of Radical Political Economics, 16, 1985, 95-114.
  27. Issues in Political Economy, co-edited with P. Nore, London, Macmillan, 1979.
  28. “The Consumption Function: a Study of a Failure in Positive Economics”, in F. Green and P.Nore (eds.) Issues in Political Economy, Macmillan, 1979, 33-60.
  29. “Two Contrasting Approaches to the Appraisal and Critique of Economics”, British Review of Economic Issues, 1977, November.
  30. “Empiricist Methodology and the Development of Economic Thought”, Thames Papers in Political Economy, 1977, Spring.
  31. “The Myth of Objectivity in Positive Economics”, in F. Green and P. Nore (eds.) Economics: An Anti-Text, Macmillan, 1977, 3-20.
  32. Economics: An Anti-Text, co-edited with P. Nore, Macmillan, 1977. Translated editions in Chinese (in Taiwan), Greek, Portuguese and Italian.